February 21, 2019 brianradio2016

You’ve likely heard about the explosive demise of Elizabeth Holmes’ blood-testing company Theranos , a downfall that began in late 2015 with an investigative piece by Wall Street Journal reporter John Carreyrou that questioned the reliability of its testing and unmasked the company’s use of third-party devices. But you haven’t heard…

February 20, 2019 brianradio2016

Samsung unveiled a highly anticipated smartphone with a foldable screen in an attempt to break the innovation funk that has beset the smartphone market. But it’s far from clear that consumers will embrace a device that retails for almost $2,000, or that it will provide the creative catalyst the…

February 20, 2019 brianradio2016

Apple plans to make it easier foe developers to create apps that, for the first time, can be used across all the company’s mobile and desktop platforms, according to a new Bloomberg news report.

At its upcoming World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC) in June, Apple is expected to begin those app integration efforts with the release of software development kits (SDKs) that allow developers to write iPad apps that also work on Macs.

In 2020, Apple plans to expand the SDK so iPhone applications can be converted into Mac apps in the same way, according to Bloomberg. The report didn’t add much detail to what was already known about Apple’s Project Marzipan, as the initiative is called internally. Marzipan was initially talked up at last year’s WWDC.

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February 20, 2019 brianradio2016

When Apple launched its enterprise developer certificate program — which helps enterprises make their homegrown apps for employee use-only available through iTunes — it had to make a difficult convenience-vs.-security decision: how much hassle to put IT managers through to get their internal apps posted. It chose convenience and, well, you can guess what happened.

Media reports say pirate developers used the enterprise program to improperly distribute tweaked versions of popular apps — including Spotify, Angry Birds, Pokemon Go and Minecraft — while others used the platform to distribute porn apps along with real-money gambling apps. And all the bad guys had to do was lie to Apple reps about being associated with legitimate businesses. Apple didn’t bother to investigate or otherwise verify the answers.

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