July 14, 2017 brianradio2016

The official Go blog has provided the first concrete details about the next version of Google’s Go language, which is used to create popular applications like Docker and Kubernetes, as well as to incrementally replace critical internet infrastructure.

But Go developers waiting for immediate word about generics, or other pet features they’ve long been waiting to see added to the language, are going to walk away disappointed.

The post, written by Go architect Russ Cox, details how the chief goal for Go 2 is “to fix the most significant ways Go fails to scale.” By “scale,” Cox is referring to both production and development. The former is about “concurrent systems interacting with many other servers, exemplified today by cloud software,” and the latter is about “large codebases worked on by many engineers coordinating only loosely, exemplified today by modern open-source development.”

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July 14, 2017 brianradio2016

The official Golang blog has provided the first concrete details about the next version of Google’s Go language, which is used to create popular applications like Docker and Kubernetes, as well as to incrementally replace critical internet infrastructure.

But Golang devs waiting for immediate word about generics, or other pet features they’ve long been waiting to see added to the language, are going to walk away disappointed.

The post, written by Golang architect Russ Cox, details how the chief goal for Golang 2 is “to fix the most significant ways Go fails to scale.” By “scale,” Cox is referring to both production and development. The former is about “concurrent systems interacting with many other servers, exemplified today by cloud software,” and the latter is about “large codebases worked on by many engineers coordinating only loosely, exemplified today by modern open-source development.”

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July 14, 2017 brianradio2016

Although its common to think of a secure website as the opposite of an insecure one, the choice is not, in fact, binary. For a website to be truly secure, there are about a dozen or so ducks that all need to be lined up in a row.

Seeing HTTPS does not mean that the security is well done, secure websites exist in many shades of gray. Since web browsers don’t offer a dozen visual indicators, many sites that are not particularly secure appear, to all but the most techie nerds, to be secure nonetheless. Browser vendors have dumbed things down for non-techies.

Last September, I took Apple to task for not having all their ducks in a row, writing that some of their security oversights allowed Apple websites to leak passwords.

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July 13, 2017 brianradio2016

The R Consortium is trying to find out what R users think of the language, how they use it, and how things might be better.

This is “the first of what we hope will be an annual survey of R users,” according to a blog post by Joseph Rickert and Hadley Wickham, members of the Consortium’s Board of Directors.

You can take the survey here.

The industry-backed R Consortium aims to promote use of R and improve the platform, in part by funding projects and supporting community growth.

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