March 28, 2017 brianradio2016

What can you say that hasn’t already been said about an artist that defined a decade? We’re kicking off our series on the 70s with one of the biggest musicians in history – Harry Wayne Casey, leader of KC and the Sunshine Band! They had dozens of hits you know by heart and sold 100…

March 28, 2017 brianradio2016

Linux distros and software bugs

Linux is one of the best operating systems around, but no OS is perfect. All operating systems end up having bugs of one kind or another, including your favorite Linux distributions.

A writer at MakeUseOf has listed six reasons why Linux distributions often have their share of bugs.

Bertel King Jr. reports for MakeUseOf:

I’ve been a long-time GNOME user, but for the past few months, I was in a loving relationship with Elementary OS. I found much to love in the minimalist Linux-based operating system, and I encouraged readers to give it a try.

But that has changed. The number of bugs I encountered grew over time, and I’ve recently had enough. As a freelance writer, the only thing I need is a working laptop. If that’s not reliable, then I’m wasting time trying to fix the one tool my job requires.

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March 28, 2017 brianradio2016
March 28, 2017 brianradio2016

Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier.

Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

March 28, 2017 brianradio2016

Networking has always been one of the most persistent headaches when working with containers. Even Kubernetes—fast becoming the technology of choice for container orchestration—has limitations in how it implements networking. Tricky stuff like network security is, well, even trickier.

Now an open source project named Cilium, which is partly sponsored by Google, is attempting to provide a new networking methodology for containers based on technology used in the Linux kernel. Its goal is to give containers better network security and a simpler model for networking.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

March 28, 2017 brianradio2016
March 28, 2017 brianradio2016

Products based on the IEEE 802.11ad (WiGig) standard have really only begun rolling out over the past year, but an effort to deliver an enhancement dubbed 802.11ay that promises to deliver faster and longer range W-Fi networks is gaining steam. 

Here’s the lowdown on this newest in the 802.11 WLAN series.

I can’t believe I have another 802.11something-or-other to keep track of. 

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March 28, 2017 brianradio2016

Visitors at Cebit in Hanover last week had a chance to do what some people in Switzerland have been doing for almost a year now: take a ride on an autonomous shuttle.  

The vehicle moves around using a number of video cameras and sensors. Two such shuttles have been operating in Sion since the summer of 2016, despite the program being shorty halted in September due to a small accident.

Although the shuttles do not require a driver, a safety attendant is on board at all times to make sure they run smoothly and to stop the vehicles in an emergency. 

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March 28, 2017 brianradio2016

From development to deployment, one the most distinctive traits of using containers is speed. The development cycle is not only rapid, but divided into multiple, bite-sized components that are constantly updated. At runtime, frequent updates and sometimes ephemeral workloads make it a challenge to lock down any environment. This scenario perfectly exemplifies why speed has always been the enemy of security, but in container-based development environments, there is a way to nip this problem in the bud: automation, automation, and more automation.

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