February 1, 2017 brianradio2016
February 1, 2017 brianradio2016

Google is open-sourcing its Chrome browser on the Apple iOS platform, after making changes enabling the code to be part of Google’s Chromium browser project.

The code will be moved to the open source Chromium repository, which lets developers build their own Chrome-like browsers. It had been kept separate from Chromium because of Apple’s requirement that all iOS browsers be built on the Apple-controlled WebKit rendering engine.

But after years of refactoring to cleanly separate WebKit from the Chrome for iOS code, the Chrome for iOS code is rejoining Chromium, Google said in a bulletin. (Chrome on other operating systems uses Google’s own Blink browser engine.) Developers can compile the iOS version of Chromium like they can for other Chromium versions. Google said it had spent a lot of time during the past several years making changes required to move the code for Chrome for iOS into Chromium.

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February 1, 2017 brianradio2016

Over the past year I’ve reviewed half a dozen open source machine learning and/or deep learning frameworks: Caffe, Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit (aka CNTK 2), MXNet, Scikit-learn, Spark MLlib, and TensorFlow. If I had cast my net even wider, I might well have covered a few other popular frameworks, including Theano (a 10-year-old Python deep learning and machine learning framework), Keras (a deep learning front end for Theano and TensorFlow), and DeepLearning4j (deep learning software for Java and Scala on Hadoop and Spark). If you’re interested in working with machine learning and neural networks, you’ve never had a richer array of options.  

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(Insider Story)